10 Fun Things to Do with Kids in Plano and Carrollton

If you have kids, you probably spend a lot of time looking for activities to help keep them entertained. If you happen to live in Plano or Carrollton, Texas, you will have no shortage of options to choose from. Plano and Carrollton are neighboring cities located in the north suburbs of the Dallas-Fort Worth Metropolitan area. Plano was ranked #1 on the Forbes list of America’s Safest Cities, and Carrollton was ranked 15th Best Place to Live Among Small Cities by Money Magazine. Both cities are great places to bring up children, with plenty of fun indoor and outdoor attractions nearby.

Here are several of the family-friendly places that you can take your kids to in the Plano and Carrollton areas of Texas:

  1. Heritage Farmstead Museum This living history site is a great way for your family to learn all about the history of the Texas Blackland Prairie region. With over 10,000 objects and archival materials, the Heritage Farmstead Museum has plenty of collections and exhibits that will spark your interest.
  2. The Interurban Railway Museum From children’s story time to scouting programs, the Interurban Railway Museum is a great place to go with your kids to experience interactive exhibits on electricity, science, and Plano’s history. Best of all, its free admission!
  3. Oak Point Park and Nature Preserve With over 800 acres of scenic land, Oak Point Park and Nature Preserve is Plano’s largest park and features 7.9 miles of paved paths and 5 miles of soft surface trails. The park also welcomes kayakers, canoeing, and paddleboarders, which is great for families who enjoy an outdoor adventure!
  4. Amazing Jake’s Fun and Food This indoor attraction was made for the kids, with go-karts, mini golf, laser tag, rock climbing, bumper cars, and more! To top it all off, the exciting establishment also offers an all-you-can-eat-buffet!
  5. Mill-Again Stables A-state-of-the-art horse riding school located in Plano, this riding academy will teach lessons to riders of any age, so it’s a perfect outing for the whole family!
  6. Jump Mania Not only does Jump Mania have 5 inflatables for hours of bouncing fun, but they also have an arcade with 16 games, bumper cars, mini golf, and mini bowling.
  7. Nickelmania You’ll want to bring your nickels and your game face to this establishment, so you can enjoy over 125 new and classic video games, win tickets, and get prizes!
  8. Arbor Hills Nature Preserve Hiking and biking trails weave their way through this beautiful 200-acre nature preserve peppered with pavilions and a playground.
  9. Main Event Entertainment From billiards and bowling to karaoke and laser tag, this could easily become your go-to destination for regular family outings. It’s also a great place for parties and events and has a full-service menu as well as an event menu.
  10. The Rose Gardens of Farmers Branch Located in the neighboring town of Farmers Branch, this antique rose garden is a must if you are looking to take some beautiful family photos. When the roses are in bloom, it’s absolutely picturesque with multiple rose gardens, a butterfly garden, and a bird sanctuary.

At Parker-Chase Preschool, we believe that it’s important for families to spend time together regularly. Doing fun activities with your children is a good way to strengthen your bond with them. Children who have close relationships with their parents are often more likely to listen, help, and open up about any problems that they may have in their lives.

Parker-Chase Preschool has two convenient locations in Carrollton and Plano. Both locations are just a quick drive away from these attractions and more, offering endless opportunities for family fun and bonding!

 

 

 

Bedwetting Solutions for Your Kindergartener

Once you’ve gotten past one of the most difficult stages in early childhood development – potty training – you may find yourself facing something just as challenging – bedwetting. Nighttime involuntary urination usually becomes a concern around 5 or 6 years of age, often when children enter kindergarten. This is also an age when children can become embarrassed by the issue, and parents simply become exhausted with having to change the sheets every night.

Below are some bedwetting solutions that you can try to help your child stay dry throughout the night.

Adjust daily schedules.

Make sure your child urinates right before bedtime and on a regular basis throughout the day. Also, increasing your child’s fluid intake earlier in the day, and reducing it later in the day, can help decrease nighttime accidents.

Stay calm and reassure your child.

The worst thing to do in a bedwetting situation is to get angry and blame your child for the accident. This will just result in more anxiety and pressure for your child. Instead of making a big deal out of the issue, try comforting your child instead. Reassure him that bedwetting is very common among children his age, so he knows that he is not the only one going through this.

Check for constipation.

Your child’s bedwetting problems may stem from constipation since the bladder is located right in front of the rectum. Pay careful attention to your child’s bowel movements. If you notice that she isn’t going regularly, or that the stool is hard, encourage her to drink more fluids and increase her fiber intake. This will ease the constipation and get her system up and running again.

Try an alarm.

If all else fails, you can buy a moisture alarm and attach it to your child’s underwear. The alarm will go off the moment any moisture is detected, and your child will be woken up so that he can get up and go to the bathroom to finish urinating. The bedwetting alarm works best with children over the age of 7. Eventually, in about 12 weeks, your child should be conditioned to get up on his own to use the restroom during the night, or better yet, become able to make it until the morning.

Our approach at Parker-Chase:

At Parker-Chase Preschool, we strive to help each child develop cognitively, socially, emotionally, and academically. We understand that bedwetting is a part of growing up and that accidents at home or in school may make children feel insecure, especially at the kindergarten age. As loving educators, it is our goal to instill confidence and feelings of self-worth in each child. We work with parents to build self-esteem in our students, so bumps in the road like bedwetting can be handled together confidently.

Preschool Parenting 101: How to handle a picky eater

Picky eating is normal during the toddler and preschool years. Luckily, it is typically a phase that will pass! There are many creative ways of handling a picky eater. Below are some tips to help you deal with your picky eater in a positive way, while maintaining a balanced and healthy diet.

Put your goals into perspective:

Oftentimes your child’s rejection of food has less to do with the food itself, and more to do with underlying developmental advances. For example, your child’s refusal to eat what you put on her plate may not be because she doesn’t like the food, but really because she is exercising her newfound independence as she enters the preschool age. She may feel that you are taking that independence away by forcing her to eat the foods you serve. If your goal is to get your child to eat his food, then you should try putting that goal into the perspective of how your independent little one may respond at mealtime.

A good way to do this is by giving her some control over the menu. For example, you could have a make-your-own-taco night and lay out all the ingredients on the table – corn tortillas, flour tortillas, ground beef, rice, beans, shredded lettuce, diced tomatoes, shredded cheese, diced avocados, onions – and have her pick and choose what fillings she wants in her burrito. Your child will be able to exercise her independence in this situation, and will be more willing to eat what’s on her plate if she was the one who made it!

Be a role model:

It’s important to have meals together as a family so your toddler can see you, your partner, or older siblings, eating a variety of foods like champs. By exposing your little one to family mealtime, they can see what mealtime is supposed to look like. Serve the same food that you are eating to your toddler, and encourage him to eat a few bites of it.

Try foods in different forms:

Sometimes what your child might not like about the food isn’t the taste at all, but rather the texture. If your child doesn’t like a certain food, try serving it in a different form. For instance, your child may not like cooked peas, but you could find out he loves eating frozen peas right out of the bag after steaming! You can try serving raw veggies if your child doesn’t like them cooked and vice versa. You could even puree the food and serve it in this form first to get your child used to the taste first, before serving it in its whole form and natural texture.

Eating at Parker-Chase Preschool

At Parker-Chase Preschool, we strive to create a healthy learning environment that is also appealing to our students. For children to reach their full learning potential, we believe that they should be consuming a healthy diet on a regular basis. That is why we have an onsite chef providing delicious and nutritious meals served family style for the children to enjoy!

 

 

 

 

How is preschool different from daycare?

Choosing the right early childhood education center for your little one can be difficult. This decision is critical because you want to set a good foundation for your child starting at the youngest possible age. From daycare centers to preschools, there is no shortage of options to choose from. However, many parents are left wondering if there are really any differences between a good daycare and a good preschool? And if there are differences, do the benefits of one outweigh those of the other?

We’ve broken down some typical differences between a traditional daycare center and preschools to make this big decision a little easier for you and your family:

Ages

Every childcare center is different. However, many centers that refer to themselves as a ‘preschool’ may not accept kids younger than the age of 2 or 3. The focus of preschools is often to provide a solid educational foundation for children between the ages of 2 ½ through the year they enter kindergarten (typically at age 5 or 6). Daycares, on the other hand, often accept a wider age range of children, from infants who are just weeks old, up to children who are about to start elementary school.

Parker-Chase Preschool offers a strong educational foundation for even the youngest children and preschoolers, offering a wide variety of child care options based on your child’s age. We offer programs for infants, toddlers, preschool, and pre-kindergarten-aged children.

Curriculum

Strong preschool programs tend to place emphasis on cognitive development and early childhood education. Daycare centers strive to ensure kids stay healthy and happy while away from their parents or caregivers. Preschools often have a curriculum in place that is based on a specific educational philosophy such as Waldorf, Montessori, or Reggio Emilia.  Most daycare centers will incorporate educational games and activities, but may not have a set academic curriculum or educational philosophy.   Whether the facility is called a preschool or a daycare, all childcare centers should provide quality childcare.

Our educators at Parker-Chase Preschool are dedicated to fostering the development of each child’s social-emotional, cognitive, language, physical, and creative abilities. Our curriculum is built on our knowledge of the developmental process, the individual child’s interests and needs, and the child’s family culture.

Kindergarten and Elementary Preparation

One of the main goals of a preschool is to lay the foundation for what a child needs to know before starting kindergarten or elementary school. A daycare may or may not have a preparedness plan for higher education.

At Parker-Chase Preschool, we provide a pre-kindergarten program with a focus on developing pre-literacy and pre-math skills. Through challenging and developmentally appropriate play-based activities, we nurture our pre-kindergarten students cognitively, socially, and emotionally so they are more than ready to start kindergarten when that day comes.

Hours of Operation/Scheduling                                                                   

A fundamental difference between daycare centers and preschools is often the hours of operation. Daycares typically open much earlier and stay open later than most preschools. Preschools may only run for half days or part-time schedules. Daycares are often open year-round, unlike many preschools which close during the summer and on holidays (or provide camps during these times).

Questions to Ask Yourself Before Touring a Daycare or Preschool

When you are looking for the right daycare center or preschool, an important step is to tour each of the facilities that interest you. Here are a few questions you should ask yourself before touring childcare centers that you will be considering:

  • What type of daycare or preschool environment would you feel most comfortable choosing for your child? For example, are you looking for a small, nurturing environment with just a few kids, or a larger program with many children and a larger variety of programs available?
  • Are you looking for a certain educational philosophy for your child’s daycare or preschool, such as a Montessori approach to learning or a more traditional approach?
  • What types of specific needs does your child have, such as toilet training, napping, or socializing? How does each preschool or daycare address these needs?
  • Are you looking for a preschool or daycare located near your workplace or your home? If the preschool is a private school, are the fees within your budget?
  • What kinds of needs do you have regarding your schedule? What hours would you prefer that the daycare center or preschool you choose be open to care for your child?

At Parker-Chase Preschool, both of our campuses are open from 7:00 AM to 6:30 PM. We also offer an exciting 10-week summer camp program at our Plano location to keep kids learning and having fun throughout the summer.

How to Keep Kids Learning After School

When your child steps foot outside of the classroom at the end of the school day, learning doesn’t stop. Children are constantly receiving an informal education from their environment, and from what parents teach them at home. Learning through experiences outside of the classroom helps children build bridges between theory and reality. By allowing children to be curious and explore the world around them in different ways, we provide the opportunity to engage their “natural learner” within.

Here are some simple ways you can help your child learn after school and outside of the classroom:

Play family-style games.

Young children often learn best through play experiences. Games such as Uno are great learning opportunities that can be played together as a family. Playing Uno reinforces numbers and colors, and teaches young kids some important skills such as pattern recognition and the relationship between numbers and objects. Older kids will also benefit from lessons in logic, reasoning and strategy.

Bingo is another fun option for a family game night. Bingo sharpens a child’s listening and memory skills, and aids in the ability to visualize shapes and objects and match them on a card. These skills will help children improve their reading and math abilities.

Board games such as Scrabble are great for advancing a child’s spelling, vocabulary, and literacy skills. For older kids, it also teaches math skills as they learn how to add up the points and strategize to create the words that will earn them the most points.

Exercise together.

Exercising is a great way to teach your child about the importance of keeping your body healthy. Whether you decide to go rock-climbing or play a game of basketball, exercising is a great way to emphasize the importance of staying physically active. Exercising through sports like soccer and softball are also a great way to build teamwork skills and teach lessons about adhering to rules.

Exercising doesn’t have to be too strenuous. It can be as peaceful as doing yoga, which teaches mindfulness, or as simple as walking the dog together as a family, which teaches responsibility.

Take your child with you to run errands.

Taking your child out with you, whether it’s to the grocery store or the dry cleaner, is a great opportunity for your child to spend one-on-one time with you. As they take in the world around them and see how you react to different situations, they learn valuable lessons from these real world experiences. Children often learn by imitation, so this is a great way for you to role model appropriate behaviors and establish certain values that you want your children to learn.

Learning after school at Parker-Chase

At Parker-Chase Preschool, our after school program is a great way to keep kids learning after normal school hours. Designed for school-aged children, our after school program is designed to foster peer connections, friendships, alliances, and responsibility. Offering a comfortable group atmosphere and creative learning environment, the program features weekly thematic units integrated into the schedule. After students complete their homework during the scheduled homework/study time period, they are free to play with any of the craft supplies, puzzles, board games, or manipulative toys that our classrooms are well-stocked with. We encourage our students to use their imaginations and engage in creative play that makes learning fun for everyone!

 

Surprising Childcare Discipline Solutions that Just Might Work

Are your typical discipline techniques just not cutting it anymore? Many parents and childcare experts have become extremely creative with the tactics they use to keep the peace in the household or the classroom – and you can too! Remember, each child is different. So what might work for one of your children, may not work for another. What’s important is to keep trying new tricks until you find the ones that work.

Here are some interesting solutions that might save your sanity in the long run:

For cleaning up a mess:

Let your children know that whenever they leave their personal belongings around the house in places they’re not supposed to be, pick them up and put them in a large box or sack. Do not give anything back to them until the end of the week, and then instruct them that they will have the option of buying back their belongings. You could charge them 25 cents per item if they want to buy them back. If they choose to leave them there, you can take them and donate them to Goodwill or a local charity.

This practice will not only teach your child to put their things away next time, but it will also teach them two other important concepts – the value of money and appreciation of their belongings.

For doing chores:

As much as you love them, sometimes kids can slow you down when you are trying to do housework. They may want your attention, ask you for your help in finding something, or want you to play with them. When this happens, you can give them a choice – if they want to be around you while you are doing chores, then they must help you with the chores you are working on.  If they don’t want to help, they must go elsewhere. The key is that they are not allowed to stay and just distract you.

This tactic works with either option that your children may choose. If they choose option one, then you get some extra help with the chores. If they choose option two, then you get some peace and quiet while you do your housework. Just be sure they still have their own age-appropriate chores and/or responsibilities they must do on their own time around the house to contribute to the household!

For your relaxation:

If you’re trying to relax but being bombarded with shouting, singing, banging and noisy clamor, try this quick solution. Simply tell your children that they are free to be as noisy as they want, just not here.  If your children are whining, pouting or throwing a tantrum, tell them that you’re ready to listen when they’re ready to calm down and talk.

For bedtimes:

Many childcare experts and parents agree that the trick to getting your children to go to bed without a hassle is to stick to some kind of bedtime routine. To make this routine go as smoothly as possible, and to give yourself a few hours of downtime before you go to sleep yourself, try implementing a new policy in your house. For instance, you could eliminate screen time at least one hour prior to bed time and replace it with an hour of reading books. Electronic devices are well-known for emitting a blue light that prevents the body’s natural release of the sleep hormone melatonin. Reading on the other hand is a relaxing activity perfect for helping children put themselves to sleep.

How we discipline at Parker-Chase:

At Parker-Chase Preschool, our childcare professionals use positive reinforcement and individualized discipline techniques that are consistent for each child when necessary. We make sure that the discipline methods we use are appropriate to the child’s level of understanding. Most importantly, we make sure that our teachers use only positive methods of disciple that encourage self-esteem, self-control, and self-direction. Some of these methods include using redirecting behavior and positive statements, focused on the praise and encouragement of good behavior rather than unacceptable behavior.

 

5 Advantages of Hand-Me-Downs

Although it’s nice to make each child feel special with a brand new toy or a new set of clothes, there are many benefits to hand-me-downs! Certain items are extremely easy to pass on from child to child. Whether you are the recipient or the donor of hand-me-downs, there are a variety of benefits and life lessons that are associated with passing on treasures from one child to another:

  1. Children outgrow clothes fast.

    One way to avoid spending money on new outfits every few months for your child is by accepting hand-me-downs. On the flip side, one way to prevent your child’s clothes from going to waste is by saving them to hand them down to your next child, or giving them to a younger relative, neighbor, or your favorite charity.

  2. Kids go through toys just as fast as they outgrow clothes.

    Children quickly get tired of things! One way to keep things fresh, and prevent yourself from overspending on new children’s toys all the time, is to welcome hand-me-downs from others or use the ones you have saved from your older children.

  3. Books never go out of style.

    Your children may outgrow the books as they move on to higher reading levels, but this doesn’t mean that you should throw them away. Books can easily be passed on. And what a special gift it is to pass on the joy of reading from one child to another! If you don’t know anyone that could benefit from your child’s used books, you also have the option of donating them to a local library or bookmobile.

  4. Hand-me-downs will help your child grow to appreciate the value of things in life.

    Being the contributor, or even the recipient, of a hand-me-down provides a valuable lesson in sharing for your child. Encourage your child to help sort through their belongings for items that can be donated and shared. Be sure to use the opportunity to discuss the significance of giving to others!

  5. Hand-me-downs also help your child become more environmentally conscious.

    By giving away old toys and clothes instead of throwing them away, you can teach your child the importance of sustainability. In giving items to others, you are encouraging reuse. In accepting hand-me-downs from others, you are using less “stuff.” These are valuable lessons for your child that encourage a sustainable lifestyle and teach your child how to respect the environment.

At Parker-Chase Preschool, we teach children the importance of sharing, empathizing and caring for others. Learning to share and donate your belongings to others is a valuable way to instill feelings of self-worth in each child, and help to support the development of a more well-rounded individual.

10 Superfoods for Preschool Kids and Toddlers

A healthy diet lays the foundation for a healthier child. Toddlers and children in preschool have such small tummies, so it’s important to pack every mouthful with as much vitamins and nutrients as possible. While candies, chips, and cupcakes are sure to worm their way into your child’s mouth, there are several nutrient-rich foods that are excellent choices for a healthier diet.

These 10 superfoods are perfect for preschool kids and toddlers:

  1. Eggs –

    Naturally rich in vitamin D, eggs are a great source of protein. Eating a breakfast that contains protein makes preschool kids and toddlers feel satisfied longer, easing the mid-morning hunger pains and helping them stay focused.

  2. Oats – 

    High in fiber and digested slowly, oats provide preschool kids and toddlers with a steadier stream of energy throughout the day. Whole oats are generally better than the instant packets, which tend to contain more sugar.

  3. Broccoli –

    A great immune system booster, broccoli contains vitamins A and C. Broccoli florets are a great finger food! Kids may be more excited to eat them after you tell them that they’re “little trees,” and dip them in ranch or their favorite dipping sauce.

  4. Berries –

    Filled with antioxidants and essential vitamins and minerals, berries are naturally sweet, which children tend to love! They are also a good source of fiber. Another great finger food, berries can be eaten as a snack on the go or as a dessert.

  5. Nuts

    Loaded with healthy fats which are necessary for heart health, growth and development, nuts can be a great choice for children. If your child is not a big fan of nuts by themselves, you can try various nut butters, such as almond butter or walnut butter. Spread them on a piece of whole grain toast or even add them into a smoothie!

  6. Milk –

    Full of protein and calcium, milk gives preschool kids and toddlers strong bones and healthy teeth.

  7. Fish –

    Certain types of fish, such as salmon, are high in omega-3 fatty acids, which are good for heart health and known for boosting brain development in children and adults.

  8. Carrots –

    Orange vegetables and fruits provide boosts of vitamins A and C, potassium, and lycopene (a cancer-preventative antioxidant). Carrots are great for growing kids because they are rich in beta-carotene, necessary for good eye health/vision, the growth of bones, skin and nails.

  9. Low-Fat Greek Yogurt –

    Yogurt contains healthy bacteria, protein, and calcium. Many of the “kid-friendly” varieties contain a lot of added sugars and fruit puree. Stick with a low-fat Greek yogurt and add honey or fresh fruits at home to give it that sweet flavor.

  10. Beans and Lentils –

    Full of soluble fiber, beans and lentils promote gut and heart health. Black beans are also a great source of protein and calcium.

Taking Care of Children and Nutrition at Parker Chase Preschool

At Parker-Chase Preschool, we know that good health and nutrition help build stronger, happier students. We offer daily chef-prepared meals and healthy snacks. Each meal is prepared with fresh ingredients. Our menu follows a different theme each week, so preschool kids and toddlers get excited about eating. A typical meal at Parker-Chase includes several superfoods, ensuring each child receives a well-rounded diet. A great example of a Parker-Chase lunch is fish stars with roasted plantains, corn with black beans, and a mixed fruit cup all prepared by our chef. An afternoon snack at Parker-Chase would include fresh veggies, graham crackers, cheese, or hummus.

5 Tips to Make Your Bathroom a Kid-Friendly Space

In daycares and preschools, the bathrooms are designed specifically to make it as easy as possible for toddlers and young children to use. Extra care is taken at daycares and preschools to make sure that toilets are lower to the ground, and sinks are within a child’s reach. Although it probably wouldn’t be practical for your family to install all new toilets and sinks in your house, there are plenty of other ways you can make your bathroom a more kid-friendly space.

Draw inspiration from daycares and preschools when designing your bathroom. Here are a few tips to help you get started:

  1. Get a small stool.

    This should be your first priority when creating your kid-friendly bathroom. A small step stool will make it so much easier for your toddler or preschool child to reach the sink and bathroom counters.

  2. Hang things within their reach.

    Towel hooks or towel bars are typically placed too high up for young children to reach. Make sure that you find a spot low enough, such as the lower part of the inside of the bathroom door, where your child can grab a towel with no problems.

  3. Give them their own toothbrush holder.

    Toddlers and preschoolers love the small things that are made just for them. By giving them a separate toothbrush holder in their favorite color or theme, it might encourage them to brush their teeth.

  4. A cute and durable rug.

    You don’t want your child slipping on the wet floor on their way out of the bathtub. A tightly woven rug with a fun design is perfect for the bathroom because they provide durability and breathability.

  5. Don’t be stingy with shower toys.

    The fun of bath time comes in the form of rubber duckies and colorful sea creatures. Stock up on those and keep them in a storage container separate from the cleaning gear.

At Parker-Chase Preschool, we know that when children are comfortable at school, they can reach their highest potential! Our bathrooms are just one way that we try our best to create a supportive environment that fosters a sense of self-confidence and belonging. Parker-Chase Preschool offers “little potties” and sinks that are low to the ground and ideal for any daycare or preschool. The soap dispensers are also placed within a child’s reach, making the bathroom experience for toddlers and preschoolers a breeze, so they can quickly get back to learning!

How to Prepare Your Child for the First Day of Preschool

The first day of preschool can be a big transition for both children and parents. If your child has never attended a daycare before, or if they are starting at a new preschool, the first day of school may be a stressful experience. A new environment, new faces, nerves, and separation anxiety are factors that can make this experience difficult. Luckily, there are many ways that parents can help ease the transition into preschool.

What You Can Do Before the First Day of Preschool:

  • Familiarize your child with her new school environment. Make sure to visit your child’s classroom a couple of times before the first day of preschool to familiarize him with the new space.
  • Introduce your child to her teacher beforehand to ease the nerves and increase her comfort level on the first day.
  • If possible, make special efforts to connect with other new students in the weeks leading up to school, so your child can look forward to seeing his friends again on the first day.
  • Make a plan with the teacher on the first day if you are concerned that saying goodbye will be a particularly hard time for her.
  • Talk to your child and give him a specific run-down of what will happen on the first day, so that he can create a comforting mental movie.

What You Can Do When You Get There:

  • Make the goodbyes go as smoothly as possible. Trying to sneak out isn’t the best idea, as it can pose the risk of your child losing her trust in you. Make sure you say a reassuring goodbye that you have practiced and made a routine.
  • Ask the teacher if it is okay if your child brings something from home that he can keep in his cubby, such as a family photo, a stuffed animal, or a small blanket. This will come in handy if he needs extra comforting when you leave.
  • Don’t linger around when you’re dropping her off. The longer you stay, the harder it gets to say goodbye.
  • Show your child that you are comfortable leaving. You can do this by making a funny goodbye face, or waving from outside of the classroom window.
  • Learn the other children’s names so that you make school feel like a familiar and safe place. For instance, you can tell your child, “Look, there’s some space at the sand table with Alex and Sadie.”

At Parker-Chase Preschool, we try hard to make our school as warm and welcoming as possible. Our teachers are well-trained to ease the first-day jitters, and know how to bond with each child to make sure those tears won’t last long (if they happen at all). Our nurturing staff is experienced in facilitating the formation of friendships between students to ensure that each child develops a sense of familiarity and fellowship beginning right from the first day of preschool.